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Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Learning more about the spread of myrtle rust
25 January 2018
The latest update from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) late last week confirmed there are now 218 properties infected with myrtle rust, including 13 reinfections. Nine new sites have...
Learning more about the spread of myrtle rust
25 January 2018

The latest update from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) late last week confirmed there are now 218 properties infected with myrtle rust, including 13 reinfections.

Nine new sites have been confirmed in Taranaki, Waikato, Auckland, Wellington and the Bay of Plenty – where there is now a total of 50 infected sites.

Surveillance continues in the known affected areas as well as high-risk areas in Northland, and the top of the South Island. The Department of Conservation (DOC) will undertake further surveillance in targeted areas on public conservation land through to March.

Myrtle rust has proven to be very aggressive in some New Zealand conditions. As a result, MPI is focusing efforts and resources in areas that will ensure the very best chance to minimise the impacts of the disease in the longer term, and is adapting to a long-term management approach.

Although myrtle rust doesn’t affect kiwifruit plants or vines, you may see it on other plants on your orchard or home garden. There are recommendations for home gardeners, nursey owners, and beekeepers on the MPI website. 

If you think you have found myrtle rust, don’t touch it – take a photo and call MPI on 0800 80 99 66. Be on the lookout for big yellow powdery eruptions on either or both sides of the leaf; brown/grey rust pustules (older spores) which appear on older lesions; and buckled or twisted leaves which may die off.

A useful free app -
Myrtle Rust Reporter - has also been created to quickly and easily let officials know of any symptoms.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Making use of the Psa Risk Model
25 January 2018
A reminder that KVH has developed an online video tutorial to guide growers through the Psa Risk Model. Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with...
Making use of the Psa Risk Model
25 January 2018

A reminder that KVH has developed an online video tutorial to guide growers through the Psa Risk Model.

Developed as an online, weather-based decision support system, the model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather forecast details to provide customised access to unique disease information and interpretations.

Click here to view the tutorial and click here to access the model. Please note, growers must register first – this is to protect the IP in the model and keep costs for the service down. If you haven’t already done so, please register now.

For quick and easy access to the model:

-         We recommend using the Firefox or Google Chrome browsers, as Internet Explorer does not support the software used.

-         When you log in using your email address and password, tick the ‘remember me’ box so that your computer remembers your details and you won’t have to enter them each time.

-         If internet speed is an issue for you, setting a shorter time in the model will help the download pace.

-         If you have any queries please contat KVH on 0800 665 825 or email us. We’re happy to help.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Measuring Psa weather risk online
25 January 2018
Developed as a weather-based decision support system, the online Psa Risk Model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather...
Measuring Psa weather risk online
25 January 2018

Developed as a weather-based decision support system, the online Psa Risk Model helps growers with orchard management in a Psa environment. It includes actual weather station data and weather forecast details to provide disease information and interpretations.

Recently, we’ve had a few calls asking for clarification about the low Psa risk forecast by the model.

Risk is influenced by both temperature and wetness. Where temperatures are above 20 degrees infection is unlikely (based on the Psa growth model research) so the model has often recorded light risk, even during days of rain. The online model has been checked by experts and has been accurately recording risk through the recent warm and wet weather period.

Growers can hover over the models ‘predicted temperatures plot’ to determine forecast temperatures. Where the mean day/night temperatures are 20 degrees or more, growers will notice the risk drops significantly.

It would be prudent to protect damaged canes on sites where Psa has remained a problem through late spring and early summer, and where innoculum load is likely higher - particularly if new growth is present or pruning rounds have been completed since copper was applied. Also, take care to avoid applying copper in high humidity or through the heat of the day, to minimise any risk of fruit marking or phytotoxicity.

Read more about how to make the most of the Psa Risk Model and how to easily log in here.

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
You have the power to protect your investment
25 January 2018
Biosecurity threats could affect your OGR, and have wider ramifications for the local community through loss of productivity and jobs, and potential movement restrictions. For example, Brazilian...
You have the power to protect your investment
25 January 2018

Biosecurity threats could affect your OGR, and have wider ramifications for the local community through loss of productivity and jobs, and potential movement restrictions. For example, Brazilian Wilt, the fungal disease decimating kiwifruit orchards in Brazil is resulting in up to 50% vine loss on some orchards and threatens the viability of their entire kiwifruit industry.

The best way to protect your orchard and investment is to have a good understanding of risks - restrict access to those who you are comfortable share your knowledge and requirements. This will limit or prevent the spread of unwanted pests and diseases vine-to-vine and between orchards. Be sure to consider the risk from people, vehicles, machinery and tools that come on to your property. Define and signpost access areas, using the free signs from KVH that are available through your local pack-house.

The importance of good biosecurity practices was highlighted last week by the farming industry, which is currently dealing with several properties infected with the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis. The president of Federated Farmers wrote a column for the NZ Herald reiterating their important on-farm biosecurity messages, which not surprisingly align well with what is standard across our kiwifruit industry.

Where and when restricting access isn’t practical, ensure good orchard hygiene practices, particularly the KVH hygiene recommendations, are followed. Tools should be cleaned and sanitised at least between rows to limit the inadvertent spread of biosecurity threats within the property. Diseases can be spread with tools that are not effectively sanitised between vines. When working in a disease affected orchard, best practice is to move from the least affected to the most affected areas.

Harvest is a time when there is a lot of movement onto and between orchards. Maintaining good orchard hygiene is particularly important over this period. Harvest bins in all regions must be sanitised and clear of plant material prior to reuse. Growers need to ensure bins moving onto their orchard are inspected and free of leaf and plant material, to minimise individual risk.

Share your biosecurity expertise with visitors, harvest staff, and contractors and make sure they know, and follow, your hygiene requirements. If anyone visiting or working on your property – including friends and family – have been overseas recently, consider the risks they pose through potentially dirty footwear and hitchhiking pests in luggage. Make sure everyone that works on your orchard also knows to report anything unusual to either the Ministry for Primary Industries on 0800 80 99 66 or KVH on 0800 665 825 (encourage them to add these numbers to their phone contacts).

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Unwanted!
25 January 2018
Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our...
Unwanted!
25 January 2018

Each month we profile one of the 12 most unwanted pests featured on our ‘Port of Tauranga – committed to biosecurity excellence’ calendar. They could all potentially enter our borders and have a major impact on the local community and businesses, the kiwifruit industry or other local growers.

This month, the focus is on the nun moth, not present in New Zealand and considered a serious pest to forestry industries across the world.





In countries where nun moth is established, the species undergoes outbreaks every few years causing significant damage to forests. Larvae feed on the foliage of a wide range of trees, causing defoliaton of leaves or needles. During outbreaks, complete defoliation of stands has been seen.

The nun moth is considered a serious biosecurity threat to New Zealand as it is a conifer-feeding specialist. It is also difficult to detect at the border as the females lay eggs deep within crevices on containers, pallets, and ships. If caught early it could be eradicated, however it would cause considerable growth loss if a population spread. Read more here.

Everyone can play a part in keeping unwanted pests and diseases out of New Zealand. If you come across anything unusual, catch it, snap it, and report it to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on 0800 80 99 66.

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Keeping girdles safe from Psa
25 January 2018
Previous Plant and Food Research (P&FR) trials showed that Psa can enter kiwifruit plants via girdles, remain within the girdle for at least five weeks, and move from the girdle point through the...
Keeping girdles safe from Psa
25 January 2018

Previous Plant and Food Research (P&FR) trials showed that Psa can enter kiwifruit plants via girdles, remain within the girdle for at least five weeks, and move from the girdle point through the plant.

Cleaning and sterilising girdling tools between plants is therefore strongly recommended as best practice to reduce risk of introducing and transferring Psa between plants.

A recent P&FR report monitoring the effectiveness of wound protectants against Psa has also shown that the current grower practice of spraying girdling wounds with a solution of label rate copper was sufficient to prevent infection of girdles. This practice also allowed wound healing, with callus formation not obviously inhibited by application of the Nordox solution. Previously, science had shown that unprotected girdles can be infected for at least 15 days after girdling. This new result supports recommended best practice.  

The report also notes that neither copper paste nor Inocbloc paste should be applied to girdling wounds. Copper paste did not provide protection and application of Inocbloc interfered with wound healing. These products were however the most effective wound protectant on pruning cuts.

A copy of this report will be available shortly on the KVH website.
 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Latest BMSB finds at the border
25 January 2018
Since the start of the high-risk season in September, there have been more than 900 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border. More detail can be read in the January KVH risk update...
Latest BMSB finds at the border
25 January 2018

Since the start of the high-risk season in September, there have been more than 900 Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs (BMSB) found at the border.

More detail can be read in the January KVH risk update for BMSB, which includes latest data reported by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and information about activities involving KVH to make sure that everything possible is being done to manage the threat posed by this unwanted pest.

The risk period for BMSB stretches throughout the summer so remember to be on the lookout and report anything unusual. Information and videos about the impacts of this bug are available on the KVH website.

 

Biosecurity News
25 January 2018
Biosecurity risk at a glance
25 January 2018
The latest KVH Dashboard is now available, providing a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry. The Dashboard is produced to give...
Biosecurity risk at a glance
25 January 2018

The latest KVH Dashboard is now available, providing a quick overview of biosecurity risk and the work KVH is doing to manage risk for the kiwifruit industry.

The Dashboard is produced to give growers and the industry a view of current biosecurity threat levels and our ability to manage these threats should they arrive here.

Biosecurity News
11 January 2018
Help stop the stink bug invasion
11 January 2018
Summer in New Zealand means high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) hitchhiking in packages, luggage, cargo and on people. There have been fairly recent threats close to home - BMSB...
Help stop the stink bug invasion
11 January 2018

Summer in New Zealand means high-risk season for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) hitchhiking in packages, luggage, cargo and on people.

There have been fairly recent threats close to home - BMSB were found at the border by staff within a transitional facility in Christchurch, and after a number were found in Sydney late last year having smuggled themseves into the country on a freight container, the NSW Department of Primary Industries has called on residents to be extra vigilant for the bug and regularly inspect their vegetable and fruit gardens to limit the likelihood of spread.

It’s important that everyone understands the seriousness of a BMSB invasion, as it is not just a horticultural pest but a real lifestyle pest as well. Not only will the bugs ruin crops and gardens, they will also infest buildings and houses. BMSB likes to hide in dark spaces, cracks and crevices. Keep an eye out for them and if you think you’ve found anything unusual catch it, snap it, and report it to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on 0800 80 99 66.

Check out this video from the USA where the ever-expanding BMSB population is taking over lifestyles. Share the video with your friends and family as everyone will be affected by this pest if it establishes in New Zealand.

Company Notices
11 January 2018
Happy New Year
11 January 2018
Whether you’re back in the thick of it or still on a well-earned break taking advantage of the warm weather, we hope you all had a merry Christmas and enjoyed spending time with friends and...
Happy New Year
11 January 2018

Whether you’re back in the thick of it or still on a well-earned break taking advantage of the warm weather, we hope you all had a merry Christmas and enjoyed spending time with friends and family over the holiday season.

The KVH office opened and returned to normal hours this week so please do get in touch if there is anything we can help with. The team have been out inspecting containers from Italy, and thankfully no stink bugs were found (read more about keeping this unwanted pest out). If anyone is importing containers from Europe, we’re happy to assist with inspection when devanning.

We look forward to working with you throughout the year to ensure our biosecurity system remains strong and we continue to keep damaging pests and diseases from reaching our orchards.

 

Company Notices
11 January 2018
New Chief Executive announced
11 January 2018
KVH has announced the appointment of Stu Hutchings as new Chief Executive. Stu takes over from current Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, at the end of March. When announcing the appointment KVH...
New Chief Executive announced
11 January 2018

KVH has announced the appointment of Stu Hutchings as new Chief Executive.

Stu takes over from current Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, at the end of March.

When announcing the appointment KVH Board Chairman, Adrian Gault, said Stu will join the KVH team well qualified with a wealth of experience and knowledge in management of biosecurity risks, research and innovation, and working alongside those within industry as well as government partners.

Stu’s most recent management role at OSPRI (a partnership between primary industries and government to manage the NAIT and TBfree programmes) has included responsibility for establishing the framework for delivery of a new long-term pest and disease management plan and several innovative research projects.

Stu is looking forward to joining a committed and future-thinking organisation that has great support and backing from kiwifruit growers, who he sees as key to the success of the industry.

Read more about Stu in the formal announcement here. 
 

Company Notices
11 January 2018
Your free 2018 calendar
11 January 2018
If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful  KVH and Tauranga port community 2018 unwanted pest calendars, send us an email letting us know your postal...
Your free 2018 calendar
11 January 2018

If you or your organisation would like one of the fantastic, bright and colourful  KVH and Tauranga port community 2018 unwanted pest calendars, send us an email letting us know your postal address and we’ll get one in the mail to you.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz