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Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017
On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and...
Japan update: biosecurity similarities
9 March 2017

On a recent trip back to New Zealand, Zespri’s Japan supply manager Bryan McGillivray shared insights on the spread of Psa and other unwanted pests in Japan with Zespri colleagues and KVH.

Bryan said, since Psa3 (the previously called Psa-V) arrived in Japan in 2014, it developed and spread through the Japanese kiwifruit industry as it did here. Climatic differences such as Japan’s hotter summers had reduced the pace of the spread of Psa somewhat. Of Japan’s 2,177 hectares of kiwifruit, around 69% is now infected with Psa3.
 
As in New Zealand, Hort16A has been most affected by the Psa and blocks are being removed as they become uneconomic. Southern areas of Japan remain free of Psa and movement controls are in place to help protect orchards.
 
Some potential biosecurity threats to New Zealand are already present in Japan providing an opportunity to learn how growers manage these pests and what else should be on our radar as emerging risks to our industry. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is one such example, a pest of significant concern to us, yet in Japan where it is native, impacts do not seem to be significant.
 
This is thought to be because the samurai wasp is also native to Japan, and parasitises BMSB eggs keeping populations in check. The good experience from Japan tells us this could be an effective control tool to have so KVH and other horticultural industries are seeking pre-approval to release the samurai wasp as a biocontrol agent should BMSB ever establish here. 
 
KVH has an information-sharing relationship with Bryan’s team in Japan, which will ensure both organisations stay abreast of pest developments and potential new research opportunities across the two countries.    
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Preparing for the next biosecurity incursion at an on-orchard level
9 March 2017
The threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) highlighted in recent Bulletin articles, has reinforced the risk of biosecurity incursions to the kiwifruit industry.    KVH is working...
Preparing for the next biosecurity incursion at an on-orchard level
9 March 2017
The threat of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) highlighted in recent Bulletin articles, has reinforced the risk of biosecurity incursions to the kiwifruit industry. 
 
KVH is working with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) and other horticultural sectors to prepare specifically for BMSB, but we also have efforts under way within our own industry to ensure that we are prepared for the next biosecurity incursion - whatever this might be.
 
A key component of this is to ensure that the industry is managing our internal pathways with on-orchard biosecurity practices. To achieve this an industry working group, including growers and the wider industry, met again Tuesday to further progress the development of industry on-orchard biosecurity guidelines.
 
KVH Biosecurity Analyst Matt Dyck says the group was originally created by KVH to ensue key partners are involved in the creation of the guidelines, which will provide consistency across the industry and provide guidance as to the level of business-as-usual good biosecurity practice required. 
 
“Biosecurity puts growers investment at risk – in terms of dollar value, jobs, and community impact. It’s imperative we manage that risk and protect growers through awareness, education and operational guidelines.”
 
“Draft guidelines were presented to the group for discussion, including what supporting documents and tools will be needed to help with implementation, and therefore improve ability to withstand a future biosecurity incursion.”
 
“We received a lot of good feedback about the guidelines and posters we’ve already created, particularly around how practical they are. The workshop also raised some useful ideas about how we can make them even more fit-for-purpose for growers, packhouses and wider audiences.”
 
Next week KVH will work with other primary industries to align our approach and explore how a community-based approach can strengthen on-orchard and on-farm biosecurity.
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Nursery plants
9 March 2017
KVH have had instances where growers/nurseries have not followed the correct procedures and plants moved illegally have had to be destroyed.   All growers and all nurseries must meet Kiwifruit...
Nursery plants
9 March 2017
KVH have had instances where growers/nurseries have not followed the correct procedures and plants moved illegally have had to be destroyed.
 
All growers and all nurseries must meet Kiwifruit Plant Certification Scheme (KPCS) requirements and must follow the movement controls when sourcing/providing plants.
 
There are three options for sourcing plants:
 
KPCS “Full Certification” plants
Fully certified plants that meet all testing requirements for all target organisms.
Movement: Can be moved between regions in accordance with KVH movement controls below.
 
KPCS “within Region Only” plants
Plants that meet all KPCS requirements except freedom from Psa-V. 
Movement: Movement is restricted to within the same KVH Biosecurity region.
* Plants may not be moved from a positive property to a Not Detected property.
 
Grow for your own use
Growers may produce plants for use on their own properties.
Movement:  Movement of no more than 1000 plants per year is permitted to properties under the same ownership, within the same KVH Biosecurity region, and subject to certain biosecurity controls.
* Plants may not be moved from a positive property to a Not Detected properly.
Biosecurity News
9 March 2017
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017
Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early...
Report suspected finds
9 March 2017

Remember, there are only small market access implications from Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) but the production impact is vast. The sooner you alert us, the more we can do to help you. Early detection is key to eradication – if we don’t report and miss this window BMSB could be a challenge we have to deal with forever.

Please keep an eye out for any unusual pests and call us on 0800 665 825 or send us photographs to info@kvh.org.nz if you find anything of concern. An updated fact sheet on BMSB can be found on the KVH website.
 
Grower News
9 March 2017
Zespri roadshow presentation highlights early detection importance
9 March 2017
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil, along with other KVH staff, presented at the Zespri roadshows last week.     Barry provided a Psa update, focussed on recent discoveries of Brown...
Zespri roadshow presentation highlights early detection importance
9 March 2017
KVH Chief Executive Barry O’Neil, along with other KVH staff, presented at the Zespri roadshows last week.  
 
Barry provided a Psa update, focussed on recent discoveries of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) and the vigilance needed to ensure early detection.
 
He also touched on the risk of fruit flies and successful management of White Peach Scale risks.
 
We featured the BMSB in the last special edition of the Bulletin – read more here about why BMSB is a serious pest and recent interceptions by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).
 
Grower News
23 February 2017
Are you biosecurity savvy?
23 February 2017
KVH were delighted to see how much the contestants in the Bay of Plenty Young Fruitgrower of the Year competition knew about biosecurity. Erin Atkinson from Apata was awarded the title at an industry...
Are you biosecurity savvy?
23 February 2017
KVH were delighted to see how much the contestants in the Bay of Plenty Young Fruitgrower of the Year competition knew about biosecurity. Erin Atkinson from Apata was awarded the title at an industry dinner on February 15. Competitors faced various tasks, including a biosecurity quiz which they completed with an impressive 80 percent average. We’ve truncated the questions to create a quick five-minute quiz for those of you who want to pit your knowledge against the young fruitgrowers coming up through the industry. Answers are at the end of the bulletin. Good luck!
  1. What is the name of the Government Department / Ministry responsible for New Zealand biosecurity?
  2. What is the name of the Minister in charge of biosecurity for New Zealand?
  3. KVH and NZ Avocado are both GIA signatories.  What does GIA stand for and what is it about?
  4. What should you do if you observe plants with unusual symptoms or see an organism that may be a new invasive pest on your orchard?
  5. In February 2015, there was a significant biosecurity incursion in Auckland – what was the name of the organism that caused this?
  6. What is the name of the organism pictured left and in what ways does it look different from other shield bugs?
  7. Cruise ship passengers have been a recent focus of biosecurity efforts. What is the main biosecurity concern associated with this risk pathway?
  8. Last year a new strategy or direction statement was released for Biosecurity in New Zealand. What is the name of this and name one of the five key strategic directions included in this? 
 
Grower News
23 February 2017
Reminder: notify your packhouse
23 February 2017
If your orchard has tested positive for resistance to Psa control products, please remember to alert your packhouse so appropriate hygiene measures can be put in place. KVH are not able to notify...
Reminder: notify your packhouse
23 February 2017
If your orchard has tested positive for resistance to Psa control products, please remember to alert your packhouse so appropriate hygiene measures can be put in place. KVH are not able to notify post-harvest operators of KPINs which have returned a positive test result - your fellow growers rely on you to do so.
Grower News
23 February 2017
Control moth plant before the pods form
23 February 2017
Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are clearly visible and flowering, and before the pods form or mature.  Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New...
Control moth plant before the pods form
23 February 2017
Now is the time to destroy any missed moth plant vines, while they are clearly visible and flowering, and before the pods form or mature.  Moth plant is a South American vine; invasive in New Zealand and unfortunately well-established in Northland, Auckland, Waikato and the coastal BOP. The large seed pods open over winter months to release hundreds of wind-blown seeds.
 
The simplest and most effective control method is to use a sharp spade and chip the vines out of the ground.  Mature moth plant vines are not easy to kill with herbicide: cut the vine to within 20 cm of ground level and apply one part glyphosate to 5 parts water, plus a sticker such as Pulse, to the vine base.
 
Moth plant harbours passion vine hopper, slows down orchard shelter trimmers and is a poisonous plant. The sap can cause severe dermatitis, so wear gloves, protective clothing and consider eye protection.
 
Grower News
23 February 2017
BOTRY-Zen product rate change advised
23 February 2017
Manufacturers of BOTRY-Zen have advised changed application rates for their product. BOTRY-Zen is BioGro certified and holds a Limited Claim for Psa control. BOTRY-Zen may be applied from bud break...
BOTRY-Zen product rate change advised
23 February 2017
Manufacturers of BOTRY-Zen have advised changed application rates for their product. BOTRY-Zen is BioGro certified and holds a Limited Claim for Psa control. BOTRY-Zen may be applied from bud break to fruit set and post-harvest to bud break at the changed rate of 600g/100L. Rates quoted are for high volume spraying to run-off.
 
Please click here to refer to KVH Recommended Product list.
Grower News
23 February 2017
Quiz answers
23 February 2017
MPI Nathan Guy Government Industry Agreement – a co-ordinated biosecurity response Call the MPI hotline (0800 80 99 66) or the KVH hotline (0800 665 825) Queensland...
Quiz answers
23 February 2017
  1. MPI
  2. Nathan Guy
  3. Government Industry Agreement – a co-ordinated biosecurity response
  4. Call the MPI hotline (0800 80 99 66) or the KVH hotline (0800 665 825)
  5. Queensland Fruit Fly
  6. The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. It is bigger than similar bugs already found in New Zealand. It also has striped antennae and striped bands on the abdomen
  7. Fruitfly being brought ashore on fresh fruit
  8. Biosecurity 2025 – 1) A biosecurity team of 4.7 million; 2) A toolbox for tomorrow; 3) Smart, free-flowing information; 4) Effective leadership and governance; 5) Tomorrow’s skills and assets.
Biosecurity News
23 February 2017
Keep it up!
23 February 2017
KVH is so grateful for the vigilance of the members of the public who identified pests and alerted MPI. We have also had a Gisborne kiwifruit grower send through photographs of some...
Keep it up!
23 February 2017

KVH is so grateful for the vigilance of the members of the public who identified pests and alerted MPI. We have also had a Gisborne kiwifruit grower send through photographs of some suspicious-looking nymphs this week. Thankfully, we were able to identify these as the New Zealand native Pittosporum Shield Bug. It is great to have the support of the public in keeping these problematic pests out of New Zealand.

 
KVH, MPI and other GIA signatories are working on a number of initiatives to reduce the risk of BMSB including:
 
  1. Readiness and Response arrangements under GIA – establishing what we need to do to prepare for this threat, how we respond and how we share costs.
  2. Research efforts to mitigate risk and impact - KVH is a member of the MPI/Industry research group that oversees R&D focus and priorities. Three priorities are developing effective traps and pheromones, ACVM approval of effective sprays and assessing biological control options. One of these biological control options is promising and we aim to have pre-emptive approval for release later this year, meaning that if BMSB were to establish we would have a control tool at our disposal.
  3. Working with importers - KVH is visiting importers of machinery such as graders, mulchers and tractors, to ensure staff are aware of biosecurity hygiene and what pests to keep an eye out for.
  4. Communications to increase the likelihood of early detection – KVH is co-funding a BMSB communications campaign with MPI and other GIA partners, to raise public awareness and increase the likelihood of early detection through passive surveillance. The campaign includes digital and print advertising deployed through a number of channels targeting potential pathway entries for BMSB. This includes passenger (e-ticket advertising, and signage at Auckland International Airport), mail (advertising targeting overseas shopping on eBay and NZ Post) and industry partners, magazines and journals. KVH is strengthening awareness within the kiwifruit industry, associated industries such as the Port of Tauranga and the freight and logistics sector, and with members of the public. This includes school and polytechnic presentations visits utilising our display specimens, Bulletin & Kiwifruit Journal articles, fridge magnets, calendars, wall planners, and presentations at Zespri Roadshows (updates included at upcoming Roadshows next week).
 
Growers are a key line of defence – you are best-placed to spot invaders early on. Please keep an eye out for any unusual pests and call us on 0800 665 825 or send us photographs to info@kvh.org.nz if you find anything of concern. An updated fact sheet on BMSB can be found on the KVH website.
Biosecurity News
23 February 2017
Other border news
23 February 2017
• MPI screened 684,407 air passengers for biosecurity risk in January, an increase of more than 10% (64,121) from January 2016. It intercepted some 12,600 biosecurity risk items in January. Of...
Other border news
23 February 2017
• MPI screened 684,407 air passengers for biosecurity risk in January, an increase of more than 10% (64,121) from January 2016. It intercepted some 12,600 biosecurity risk items in January. Of these, 1,829 were undeclared.
 
• As well as an increase in the number of travellers, MPI has also seen an increase in the number of travellers bringing food into New Zealand. This not only presents a biosecurity risk, it can also take hours to process which consumes precious border resources. A traveller from Malaysia recently declared a suitcase full of food, in which MPI found four mangoes infested with fruit fly larvae.
 
• MPI reports that its new cruise ship accreditation scheme is working well to improve passenger compliance. The seizure rate from accredited vessels is half of that of unaccredited. Vessels can achieve accreditation by demonstrating they manage biosecurity risk; they benefit by receiving faster passenger processing. So far this year there have been 216 risk items seized from cruise ships. Most interceptions involved fresh produce (56 percent), which has the potential to host fruit fly.
 
• MPI has introduced tougher scrutiny for Transitional Facilities (an importer that can unload containers on their premises). It is now unlikely to approve new applications for TFs that plan to receive fewer than 10 containers a year. KVH supports this move as part of a wider effort to improve biosecurity management on these pathways.
 
• Research in the United States has shown that dogs can be trained to sniff out BMSB so MPI has been conducting trials to train dogs here in New Zealand. If successful, this will be a valuable tool for use in any future incursions.

Kiwifruit Vine Health

Suite 3, Level 1, Customhouse Building
314 Maunganui Road, Mount Maunganui
(entrance cnr Totara and Rata Street)
PO Box 4246, Mount Maunganui, 3149
New Zealand

Tel:  0800 665 825
Fax: 07 574 7591

Email: info@kvh.org.nz